Tag Archives: Scrap Quilt

2016-29 Autumn Tumbler

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This queen size quilt began when I decided to use up scraps left over from the Winding Ways quilt (2016-17).  I dislike having leftovers as they clog my creativity, so I try to use them up right away.  Using my Accuquilt die, I cut as many tumblers as I could out of the scrap pieces.  Then I went through my scrap bin and found more autumn colored fabrics and cut more tumblers.  I don;t think I used any yardage at all, just scraps.  It is amazing how many scraps one collects over the years!

I strove for a balance of light and dark so I could create contrast between the tumbler shaped pieces.  The pieces were assembled in units of two, then four, then eight and then then into the rows for the quilt.  Fortunately, I have a large table where I can layout the rows to check color balance and separation.  Once he center was done, I added a gold colored inner border and an red and gold print outer border.  It was quilted with a leafy design that adds texture and an autumn theme.

This quilt won Grand Champion, Machine Quilting at the 2016 Drayton Fair and Grand Champion, Machine Quilting at the 2016 Arthur Fall Fair.  It went on to OAAS District 7 competition where it won first place.  It will now go on to the Ontario provincial level competition in February 2017.

This quilt has been selected by my nephew Charley and his lovely wife Alice as their wedding quilt.  They are patiently waiting until after the provincial competition before they can take it to their new home.

 

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2016-27 Pumpkin Nine Patch

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This quilt was inspired by the border fabric.  I bought this fabric at the member boutique at the Quilt Show of the Greater Ann Arbor Quilt Guild in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  What a great sale!  I spent lots of money there and was particularly pleased with this border fabric. (Their show was exceptionally good too!)

The size of the quilt was determined by the amount of border fabric I had.  First I calculated how big I could make the quilt considering the corners had to be mitered to keep the flow of the design.  Once I knew the outside dimensions, then I built the inside of the quilt to fit.  I used some six inch nine patch blocks that came from a Guild exchange of blocks and made a few extra to expand the center.  After playing with several layout options, I selected a lovely rusty-orange fabric for the setting triangles.  It is quilted with  Superior Omni thread in Ginger Spice  using a digital design called Damask by Ann Bright.   I’m pleased with the result.

I have put it with the group of quilts from which I invite brides and grooms to select their wedding quilts.  However, I hope no one picks this one because I like it.  I could live quite happily with this quilt.

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2016-24 Winding Ways Topper

winding-ways-topper

This table topper (40″ by 40″) was created with the blocks leftover from my friend’s Pat’s Winding Ways Quilt (2016-17).  Some of these blocks were my tester blocks when I was figuring out how to get the best results. a few of these do not meet well in the middle, so they were not good enough for Patty’s quilt.  (Look closely in the bottom row and you will see what I mean.) Some of the blocks are just leftover because of color placement and balance in the quilt.  So at the end of her quilt project, I had 16 leftover blocks.

I do not like having left-overs in my studio, so I try to make them up into another project or just give them away.  Sixteen blocks is  just enough to make a table topper that can double as a small table cloth.  It went together quickly.  Since I  had scraps of Pat’s borders still sitting on my cutting table,  I put the same borders on this one too.  It was very simple to make because most of the work was already done.

The digital quilting design is “Wild Mouse” by Ann Bright.  It is an edge to edge design that gives great movement to the topper but can be executed quickly on the longarm.  The matching binding was attached to the front and hand stitched to the back.

This is a nice outcome for blocks that did not make the cut to go into the large quilt.   It will have a very useful life!

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2016-17 Winding Ways

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This queen sized quilt was made as a wedding gift for my close friend Pat and her husband Alan.  These colours are Pat’s favourites and they suit her neutrally decorated house.  It took me a while to collect the fabrics and I enjoyed every minute of it!  Some of the fabrics came from my stash while most were acquisitions on two memorable shopping trips.

The quilt design is called Winding Ways, a traditional block that when set together creates a secondary circular design.  It took quite a while to piece this quilt, but since I was not in a hurry, I was able to enjoy the process.  I assembled most of the top during the summer at our cottage where my design wall is a hardwood floor adjacent to the main traffic area.  Everyone who passed by offered comments and opinions on where I should move blocks for best effect.  I feel like it was a group project!

The quilting design is a series of overlapping circles to echo the secondary circular design and give movement to the quilt.  Pat really likes the quilt and sent me this photo showing the quilt on her bed.  Looks great, doesn’t it?quilt-on-pats-bed

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2016-6 Carpenter Star

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This quilt was inspired by some men’s shirting prints I received from a Toronto shirt factory that makes upscale shirts.  I made a bunch of half square triangles and set them together in a Carpenter Star design.  I opted to make the flying geese to increase the size of the quilt.  With extra negative space, it made a great canvas for fancy quilting, so custom quilting with feathers seemed to fit my vision.  The quilting design in the blocks is Barbara’s Feather’s by Donna Klienke, the pattern in the border is Naysa’s Feathers by Christy Dillon and the design in the flying geese is a simple feathered sash I created.  The background of the flying geese is freehand matchstick quilting.  It is single bed size.

I like how the blank space shows the fancy quilting well.  This is one of my personal favourites of the year.

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2016-1 Colourwash Table Runner

colourwash-table-runner

This runner started from a group of leftover strip sets I found in my scrap bin.  I played around with them to create a pleasing layout of colour and then assembled.  I pulled two coordinating fabrics from my stash to add as inner and outer border.  It was custom quilted in a feather design with a muted rose thread.  I entered it in a few fall fairs this year and it won first prize most of the time.  A very pleasing result from a bunch of scraps!

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2015-37: Fast Forward to the Border

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This is a quilt I made in 1997 – one of the first quilts I ever made.  I gave it to my son Dan for Christmas that year when he was nine years old.  He loved it and named it “Fast Forward to the Border”  because he linked the flying geese design to the fast forward button on the VCR player.  (That is how long ago – no DVD invented yet!)  Dan used it daily though the remainder of elementary school, high school and then took it with him through five years of undergraduate study and two years of graduate study.  Not only did he love the quilt, so did Kyle, one of his roommates.  It became the object of a friendly war when Kyle would steal the quilt first to the living room and then to his bedroom.  Dan said he would often lose possession of the quilt for months at a time! After all the constant use, the quilt became somewhat worn.

When Dan moved home after graduating with his MSc, he asked me to fix the frayed binding.  While removing the old binding, I noticed that the backing fabric was also fraying in places, so I opted to add a whole new backing and quilt it over again.  The original quilting was done on my domestic machine and as a beginner quilter, not especially well done or dense.  This time, I mounted the new backing on my longarm and then treated the old quilt as the batting and top.  I quilted it with a tighter design that will keep it secure through the duration of his current degree and beyond.  Requilting it also gave me an opportunity to square it up.  Nineteen years of quilting experience has taught me a lot about quilt construction.  I smiled to see this early quilt is missing a lot of points and that one side was longer than the other.  Nothing could be done about the points; However while it was on the frame, I eased in the fullness on one side so that it was square and true.  I am really happy to have the chance to re-do this quilt.  My son is pleased with the result.

During the summer, while I was hand stitching the binding, his roommate Kyle came to visit at the cottage.  His eyes lit up when he saw the quilt and again teasingly claimed ownership of the quilt.  We all laughed and I have made note of the type of quilt to make Kyle when he gets married!  It feels rewarding to know that my quilting is valued and appreciated.

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